What’s the Magic Score?

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We’ve all done it. Researched the average GMAT score of the school you’re interested in and then cringed. How can I ever get into that school? I’m nowhere near the average score. I need a miracle. They must only admit geniuses. I wonder what the average IQ score is for admitted students.

But what score do I really need anyway? Do I need to have a higher than average score because I’m younger than the average applicant? Would a higher than average score help because I don’t have experience in consulting or corporate finance.  I read a great article today that gave a great perspective about average GMAT scores.

If you can tackle the GMAT, schools will assume you will succeed in their programs. A promise of success is a factor in the evaluation process. If you cannot reach the average score, don’t let it keep you from applying. Harvard admits students who have scores in the 500s. I wouldn’t say this is very common, but if you have a great application, interview well and have relevant work experience, a low GMAT score might not be limiting.

I’ll end with a blurb from an article from Manhattan GMAT. You can read the full article here: http://www.manhattangmat.com/blog/index.php/2014/08/08/what-is-a-good-gmat-score/?utm_source=bronto&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Learn+More&utm_content=08%2F18%2F2014&utm_campaign=GMAT_Newsletter_81814

“Seriously, consider who’s telling you that you don’t actually need these crazy high scores. I work for a test prep company; our whole reason for existing (and making money!) is to help people get higher scores. If even I’m telling you that you don’t need a 750 or a 50 or 51 on quant, then believe it!”

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9 thoughts on “What’s the Magic Score?

  1. Narenn

    Hello,

    Congratulations on launching the blog. We would love to feature your blog on
    GMATClub. If interested, please let me know.

    Thanks!!

    Like

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